"Bolshaya Moskovskaya" Hotel - Odessa (1912)

"Bolshaya Moskovskaya" Hotel - Odessa (1912)

Diamonds
Nu Virgos

Russian Classics:

Nu Virgos - “Diamonds”

The young daughters of Tsar Nicholas II: Olga, Tatiana, Maria and Anastasia - Winter Palace, Saint Petersburg (1905)

The young daughters of Tsar Nicholas II: Olga, Tatiana, Maria and Anastasia - Winter Palace, Saint Petersburg (1905)

The Tereschenko Blue Damond
The original owners of this gem were the Tereschenko family. They were sugar-kings in pre-communist Russia. One member, Mikhail (1886-1956), who held advanced political views, became Kerensky’s Minister of Foreign Affairs in 1917. Four years earlier, Mikhail had deposited the diamond with Cartier in Paris. In 1915 he instructed Cartier to remount the gem as the centerpiece in a necklace containing a variety of fancy colored diamonds.
The jewel was unique in combining forty-six marquise, round, pear and heart-shaped diamonds ranging from 0.13 to 2.88 carats. Their colors were described as “jonquil, lemon, aquamarine, sultana-green, golden button, grey, blue, crevet, lilac, rose, old port, madeira and topaz.” As such, the necklace ranked among the most important creations of this century in fancy colored diamonds.
In 1916, on the eve of the Russian Revolution, the Tereschenko Diamond was secretly taken out of Russia and then passed into private ownership.
It mysteriously came up for sale on November 14th, 1984 and was auctioned-off to Robert Mouawad, a Saudi diamond dealer for a price of $4,508,196. 

The Tereschenko Blue Damond

The original owners of this gem were the Tereschenko family. They were sugar-kings in pre-communist Russia. One member, Mikhail (1886-1956), who held advanced political views, became Kerensky’s Minister of Foreign Affairs in 1917. Four years earlier, Mikhail had deposited the diamond with Cartier in Paris. In 1915 he instructed Cartier to remount the gem as the centerpiece in a necklace containing a variety of fancy colored diamonds.

The jewel was unique in combining forty-six marquise, round, pear and heart-shaped diamonds ranging from 0.13 to 2.88 carats. Their colors were described as “jonquil, lemon, aquamarine, sultana-green, golden button, grey, blue, crevet, lilac, rose, old port, madeira and topaz.” As such, the necklace ranked among the most important creations of this century in fancy colored diamonds.

In 1916, on the eve of the Russian Revolution, the Tereschenko Diamond was secretly taken out of Russia and then passed into private ownership.

It mysteriously came up for sale on November 14th, 1984 and was auctioned-off to Robert Mouawad, a Saudi diamond dealer for a price of $4,508,196. 

Equestrian statue of Peter the Great - Riga (1915)

Equestrian statue of Peter the Great - Riga (1915)

Postcard from the Yekaterinoslav Governorate - Russian Empire (1916)

Postcard from the Yekaterinoslav Governorate - Russian Empire (1916)

The Annunciation Cathedral shortly after the Bolshevik rebellion - Yaroslavl (1918)

The Annunciation Cathedral shortly after the Bolshevik rebellion - Yaroslavl (1918)

Depiction of the Russian middle class (1902)
The Russian Empire’s middle-classes worked both for the state (usually in the higher ranks of the bureaucracy) or the private sector, either as small business owners or trained professionals (such as doctors, lawyers and managers). Industrial growth in the 1890s helped to expand the middle-classes by increasing the ranks of factory owners, businessmen and entrepreneurs. The middle-classes tended to be educated, worldly and receptive to liberal, democratic and reformist ideas. They were known as trendsetters - quick to adopt the latest fashions, and were one of the few social groups which engaged in a wide range of discussions and debates. Members of the middle-class were prominent in political groups like the Kadets (Constitutional Democrats) and, later, in the Duma.

Depiction of the Russian middle class (1902)

The Russian Empire’s middle-classes worked both for the state (usually in the higher ranks of the bureaucracy) or the private sector, either as small business owners or trained professionals (such as doctors, lawyers and managers). Industrial growth in the 1890s helped to expand the middle-classes by increasing the ranks of factory owners, businessmen and entrepreneurs. The middle-classes tended to be educated, worldly and receptive to liberal, democratic and reformist ideas. They were known as trendsetters - quick to adopt the latest fashions, and were one of the few social groups which engaged in a wide range of discussions and debates. Members of the middle-class were prominent in political groups like the Kadets (Constitutional Democrats) and, later, in the Duma.

Portrait of Dr. Nikolay Dmitrievich Ermakov, a famous Russian socialite and patron of the arts (1914)

Portrait of Dr. Nikolay Dmitrievich Ermakov, a famous Russian socialite and patron of the arts (1914)

Alexander Sergeyevich Pushkin recites his poem in front of fellow students and magistrates during the Tsarskoye Selo Lyceum exam on January 8th, 1815

Alexander Sergeyevich Pushkin recites his poem in front of fellow students and magistrates during the Tsarskoye Selo Lyceum exam on January 8th, 1815